TCVM Benefits

TCVM can be used for the following in Dogs and Cats:

  • Cancer
  • Intervertebral Disc Disease
  • Injuries, muscle, tendon/ligament
  • Pain
  • Skin issues
  • Gastrointestinal disease
  • Behavioral issues
  • Kidney and Urinary diseases
  • Respiratory diseases
  • Liver disease
  • Immune problems
  • Geriatric problems

TCVM can be used for the following problems in Horses:

  • Laminitis
  • Muscle soreness
  • Back pain
  • Tendon/ligament injury
  • Arthritis, DJD
  • Poor performance
  • Geriatric Weakness

Herbal Products

We get our prescription herbs from Kan Herb and Jing Tang Herbal. Both companies make pure, safe and effective herbs just for animals. Their dosing labels are written specifically for pets.

Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine


Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) may still be relatively new to the Western world, but has been practiced in China for thousands of years. It focuses on restoring balance to the body.  Qi (“chee”) is the life force that is a blend of Yin and Yang. This Qi circulates through the body flowing though the meridians or channels in the body, which connect the acupoints that we can access. When the flow of Qi is obstructed it causes an imbalance in Yin and Yang and that leads to disease or pain. 

From a modern prospective, acupuncture is a form of nerve stimulation. By inserting an acupuncture needle local counter-irritation leads to microtrauma of the tissues. What follow that is a complex, yet integrated series of reactions that leads to stimulation of the nervous system. Depending on the acupoint that is selected and method of stimulation chosen, there will be a sequential and simultaneous activation of local, segmental and super-segmental neural pathways. These changes ultimately lead to altered blood flow, alerted humeral responses and affects within the immune system.   

Here at Sound Animal Wellness we incorporate the use of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture treatments to stimulate the chosen acupoints and restore balance to the body. In order to determine the appropriate acupuncture prescription a detailed history is taken, along with a physical exam and scanningof the body to identify a pattern. Once the pattern is identified appropriate treatment using acupuncture and other TCVM techniques can be determined.

Acupuncture is the insertion of the tips of very fine needles into the skin at specific points, called acupoints, for the purpose of treating various disorders by stimulating nerve impulses to produce a therapeutic effect. Acuipoints are locations on the body that are the focus of acupuncture, acupressure, sonopuncture and laser acupuncture treatment. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, several hundred acupuncture points are claimed to be located along what practitioners call meridians. Body acupoints are generally located using a measurement unit, called the cun, that is calibrated according to their proportional distances from various landmark points on the body. Acupoint location usually depends on specific anatomical landmarks that can be palpated. Points tend to be located where nerves enter a muscle, the midpoint of the muscle, or at the enthesis where the muscle joins with the bone. By placing needles in specific acupoints they can enhance blood circulation and stimulate the release of hormones with the goal of encouraging the body to correct imbalances.

Originally Chinese, this method of treatment is practiced in many parts of the world. It has been used to treat animals for thousands of years. Acupuncture can be explained using traditional Chinese medical theory as well as Western scientific approach.

Unlike some medical treatments, there is a very low risk of any side effects from properly performed acupuncture. Animal acupuncture should only be performed by a certified veterinary acupuncturist trained in traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM)

 


Different ways to stimulate an acupoint:

Dry Needling Acupuncture: Also known as Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling is the use of very fine sterile needles to stimulate a chosen acupoint. Acupoints are locations on the body that are the focus of acupuncture, acupressure, sonopuncture and laser acupuncture treatment. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, several hundred acupuncture points are claimed to be located along what practitioners call meridians. Body acupoints are generally located using a measurement unit, called the cun, which is calibrated according to their proportional distances from various landmark points on the body. Acupoint location usually depends on specific anatomical landmarks that can be palpated.

Moxibustion:  Moxa is an herb that when burned gives off heat and a spicy odor. Moxa can be used directly over a painful area or indirectly by heating needles placed in acupuncture points. Moxa provides warmth and energy to the body.

Aquapuncture: This is the practice of injecting of a small amount of a liquid into to a specific acupoint. This technique allows a point to be treated quickly, but have a lasting effect. The liquid exerts an energetic change by pushing tissue out of the way. The most common liquid used for acupuncture is vitamin B12.

Electroacupuncture: Electrical energy is passed through acupuncture needles and into acupoints. It is used to treat paralysis and severe pain.

LACER: The use of infrared light to stimulate acupuncture points. This works well for needle phobic patients.


Additional Treatment Practices

Low Energy Photon Therapy (LEPT) uses red and infrared light at different frequencies to help in some of the following ways:

  • Accelerate the stages of inflammation and the general healing of wounds and injuries
  • Stimulate cellular replication (which is key to healing and production of healthy tissue)
  • Increase RNA and DNA synthesis
  • Stimulate Collagen production ( component of skin, tendon, bone, cartilage and connective tissue)
  • Alteration of the immune system
  • Stimulation of fibroblast activity
  • Enhancement of vascularization (aids in improving circulation)

In practice it can be used to help with numerous conditions. A few include arthritis, back pain, injured tendons and ligaments, muscle injuries, dermatitis, lick granulomas, skin wounds, and eye problems.

Herbs: Herbs compliment acupuncture. They may decrease the number of treatments required and in some cases they can be used in place of acupuncture. Herbs are prescribed like western pharmaceuticals to treat a certain disease and they should not be used or shared without consulting your veterinarian. We get our prescription herbs from Kan Herb and Jing Tang Herbal. Both companies make pure, safe and effective herbs just for animals. Their dosing labels are written specifically for pets.

Adequan Injections: This injectable canine or equine arthritis drug helps control the signs associated with non-infectious degenerative or traumatic arthritis of joints. It contains polysulfated glycosaminoglycans (PSGAG)that the body uses to make cartilage. In fact, it is the only FDA approved source for PSGAG in the entire world.

When injected intramuscularly, it helps promote the formation of healthy cartilage and joint fluid and supports the body's natural joint repair process.

Read more about Adequan

Sound Animal Wellness, PLCC

Mobile acupuncture practice serving dogs, cats and horses in Covington, Maple Valley, Kent, Auburn, Enumclaw, and surrounding areas.

Supporting Partners

Renton West Veterinary Hospital
Renton West Veterinary Hospital is truly a unique healing facility for your pet proudly serving the Renton community

International Veterinary Acupuncture Society
The International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary acupuncture as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is used all around the world, either along or in conjunction with Western medicine, to treat a wide variety of conditions in every species of animal. Clinical research has been conducted showing positive results in the treatment of both animals and humans, and the use of acupuncture is increasing.

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